Thursday, 23 October 2014

Rolls Royce Armoured Cars - Part 6

Details, Details, Details !

Details on a model can really make them "pop".    But, details can be a two edged sword.   Too much and you may run the risk of damage when handling the model.   Too little and the model can look unfinished.   With my models I try and strike a balance.   For example when I was doing the bonnet latches, there was no way I could reproduce exactly the latch but I could make a decent representation of them and they could withstand handling as well.   I guess in the end it all boils down to the modeller's standards, skill and requirements.


First details to start were the Rifle Port covers.   On the actual vehicles there are 4 of these tear drop shaped covers over the rifle ports.   Luckily for me, my Good Lady Wife does a fair bit of Cardmaking and one of the tools she uses regularly is a Die Cutter called the "Big Shot".
Basically the selected metal stencil and the paper/card/plastic or felt to cut is placed on the tray of the machine and the lot goes through like a mangle.   Any way, one of her stencils had a tear drop shape that was perfect for the rifle port covers.   A couple of minutes later and I had more than enough covers.   These were then attached to the body of the armoured cars.



Next detail to be produced was the support brackets which go underneath the side extensions of the rear trays.   The 1914 Pattern had two types: basic metal struts, and a more curved support.   I chose to model the more curved one.


To achieve this effect, 22 mm circles were scribed and cut out of .30 thou sheet.   These were trimmed to size and then quartered.   Flanges were applied using thin strip, cut over length and then trimmed to size once dry.   The photo above illustrates the steps taken.


The 1920 Pattern had the normal curved supports at the front and the middle but the rear ones were even more "curvaceous"!   These were marked out on .30 thou sheet, glued together on the waste end and then the Dremel was used to created the curves.   The waste was then cut off and the pieces separated and applied to the model.


The trench crossing boards were simply strips of .100 x .250 strip, cut to length with a bevel filed at each end.   Small packing pieces were added to the bottom of the running boards to give a little separation between the boards.   This gave the added benefit of "locking"the brass strips well and truly into the running boards.   They aren't going anywhere!


The starting crank handles were made up from 1 mm brass wire and 20 thou sheet strip.   Holes were drilled after being marked on the strip by a simple jig.   The plastic was then trimmed down to the required size and taper, the brass wire glued in and the completed handles attached.


The doors over the 1914 Pattern radiators were simply made up from .30 thou sheet and a simplified version of the opening/closing arrangement made up from .40 thou square strip.   The 1920 Pattern radiator covers had a modified arrangement with louvres which allowed more airflow when the doors were closed.   The photo above shows the steps taken to achieve the louvres.   Also shown is the casting of the Vickers MGs which was taken from the Gun in the Airfix British Infantry Support set.


The gruelling task of riveting commences.   Rivets were applied in my usual manner i.e. individual rivets cut from .30 thou rod on the "Chopper" are applied using the Rivet Application tool shown in the foreground.   The rivet is held in place on the workbench ready to be pierced with the tool, given a dab of Tamiya Extra Thin cement and then applied to the model.   I do most of the rivets by eye, but I will measure out salient rivets so that correct spacing is ensured.   A small steel rule is used to make sure the rivets are in alignment every now and again.


Lastly, the headlight brackets were made up from .08 mm brass wire.   Again, much simplified but strong.   One piece of wire was bent up after having a flat hammered into one end.   Another piece was soldered to this.   The soldering setup I used can be seen in the above photo.   A small jig was used to hold the two pieces of wire in position whilst I soldered them. (bottom left corner of MDF)   Lastly another piece of preformed wire made up the other side of the bracket.   I turned up two headlights on my Hobby Lathe as masters and then cast the rest.   Little dimples were drilled into the masters of the headlights as guides for drilling holes to take the bent portions of the wire when they were assembled.


The 1914 Pattern Rolls Royce Armoured Car ready for a wash in warm soapy water and then undercoating.   No prizes for guessing who this one will belong to!







12 comments:

  1. Excellent work on the details! The rivets, as painstakingly to do as it looks like they would be, really make the model!

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    1. Thanks Rodger. I actually hate cutting the rivets. Applying them is not so bad. They do tend to "tone" down after some paint is applied.

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    2. Great stuff Col, if only you did 20mm :) :)

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    3. If I ever get an electron microscope, you will be the first to know Al!

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  2. Replies
    1. Thanks Mike, Sorry mate, I was referring to the White Ensign fluttering above the turret!

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  3. added this as I forgot to tick Notify me!

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    1. G'day Mike. I have sent you a PM.
      Cheers
      Col

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  4. I just discover your work I love what you do. We are not too many out there doing scratchbuilts minitures. Thanks for posting your work

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    1. Bonjour, mon ami! Thank you very much for your kind comments. It does appear that we are few in number when it comes to scratchbuilding 1/32nd scale for wargames. I have had a look at your wonderful Blog and will join it.
      Cheers
      Col

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  5. These are simply so beautiful! The Rolls Royce Armoured Car has always been one of my most favourite vehicles and to see it in 1/32 just makes my night! Have you gamed with them? They must be a joy on the table!

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  6. Thanks Private W. You're right, they were a good looking vehicle. But, no I have not gamed with them yet. One day!
    Cheers
    Col

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